Curry Spice & Everything Nice

When my children start to express curiosity about sexuality, I am not going to tell them that they’re too young to be asking or that “if you have sex you get pregnant”. The age at which children start to ask about sex indicates they are already ready to be talking about it. Some parents may find it is much earlier than they expected, and others may find that their children never want to talk about sexuality. It is a very personal subject, but it should not be taboo.

When a girl walks into the restaurant wearing a tight skirt, I am not going to tell my daughter that the girl is a slut and forbid her from dressing similarly. Instead, I am not going to comment at all unless someone else does. Whether it is a nudist walking in or a woman wearing a burka, it will not be my place to comment and I will teach my children to never voice their judgments either. However, if my children or anyone else comments on the “slut” walking in, I am going to tell them that you cannot judge how many people someone sleeps with based off how they dress, and that you should not judge them based off how many people they sleep with either.

When my son teases his friend that he is being a “pussy”, I will chastise him. I will not have my children contribute to a society that condemns femininity. I am also going to tell my son that he is not obligated to dedicate his life to masculinity, nor sentence anyone else to a specific gender role. My children will not think that their gender correlates to a specific color or behavior. People are not pure shades of pink and blue, but rather unique combinations with real texture.

When my children start to lock their doors and bring home partners, I am not going to forbid them from getting physical or demand to know every detail. Instead, I will make sure that they know everything about being safe and have clear access to protection. I will not be that parent that starts screaming hysterically when they find a condom in their child’s bedroom. Through communication and honesty, I will make sure that my children can have the safest and most fulfilling sex life possible.

—the way sexuality was never addressed in my family - moon-sylph (via perfect)

I wish my and my boyfriend’s parents were like this…

(via perfectlyy)

(via letsfack)

When you start to know someone, all their physical characteristics start to disappear. You begin to dwell in their energy, recognize the scent of their skin. You see only the essence of the person, not the shell. That’s why you can’t fall in love with beauty. You can lust after it, be infatuated by it, want to own it. You can love it with your eyes and your body but not your heart. And that’s why, when you really connect with a person’s inner self, any physical imperfections disappear, become irrelevant.

—Lisa Unger, Beautiful Lies   (via wordsnquotes)

(via rough-mornings)

Date someone who is interested in you. I don’t mean someone who thinks you’re cute or funny. I mean someone who wants to know every insignificant detail about you. Someone who wants to read every word you write. Someone who wants hear every note of your favourite song, and watch every scene of your favourite movie. Someone wants to find every scar upon your body, and learn where each one came from. Someone who wants to know your favourite brand of toothpaste, and which quotes resonate deep inside your bones when you hear them. There is a difference between attraction and interest. Find the person who wants to learn every aspect of who you are, and hold onto them.